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Ramesses II ("the Great") sought to recover territories in the Levant that had been held by the 18th Dynasty.

The New Kingdom of Egypt, also referred to as the Egyptian Empire, is the period in ancient Egyptian history between the 16th century BC and the 11th century BC, covering the Eighteenth, Nineteenth, and Twentieth Dynasties of Egypt.

Radiocarbon dating places the exact beginning of the New Kingdom between 1570 BC and 1544 BC.

Rameses III's death was followed by years of bickering among his heirs.

Three of his sons ascended the throne successively as Ramesses IV, Rameses VI and Rameses VIII.

In the eighth year of his reign the Sea Peoples invaded Egypt by land and sea.Ramesses III defeated them in two great land and sea battles (the Battle of Djahy and the Battle of the Delta).Possibly as a result of the foreign rule of the Hyksos during the Second Intermediate Period, the New Kingdom saw Egypt attempt to create a buffer between the Levant and Egypt, and attained its greatest territorial extent.Similarly, in response to very successful 17th century attacks by the powerful Kingdom of Kush, The Eighteenth Dynasty contained some of Egypt's most famous Pharaohs, including Ahmose I, Hatshepsut, Thutmose III, Amenhotep III, Akhenaten and Tutankhamun.His immediate successors continued the military campaigns, although an increasingly troubled court—which at one point put a usurper (Amenmesse) on the throne—made it increasingly difficult for a pharaoh to effectively retain control of the territories.Ramesses II was also famed for the huge number of children he sired by his various wives and concubines; the tomb he built for his sons, many of whom he outlived, in the Valley of the Kings has proven to be the largest funerary complex in Egypt.The later part of this period, under the Nineteenth and Twentieth Dynasties (1292–1069 BC), is also known as the Ramesside period.It is named after the eleven Pharaohs that took the name of Ramesses I, the founder of the Nineteenth Dynasty.

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